Category Archives: education

Abbey Green Nursery School is praised by Ofsted

Children at Abbey Green Nursery School & Children’s Centre continues to receive a good standard of education as Ofsted inspectors judge the centre to be good for the fifth consecutive time.

The Bradford Council school has sustained its Good status, in every inspection, since it was inspected in 2004; 13 years ago.

In a very complimentary report, the inspector found “the leadership team has maintained the good quality of education in the nursery since the last inspection” which was in April 2014, also saying “You and your staff have high expectations of what children can achieve.”

Children demonstrated how “caring and inclusive” they were in their behaviour; helping other children to put aprons on for play sessions and “displayed confidence in using sign language to communicate with other children.”

“The Local Authority has recognised and values this inclusivity and is currently designating the nursery as a special needs resource base.”

Staff have addressed all the recommendations from the previous inspection and other comments in the report include:

  • Phonics is taught very well.  Children enjoy the activities, and are skilled at knowing the sounds letters make.
  • You have continued to develop the Governance of the Nursery.
  • Partnership working with parents is very strong.
  • …”adult classes delivered by the family and community team in the nursery have helped them in developing their knowledge of English, and so help them support their children.”

Headteacher, Margot Dixon, said:  “We are delighted with this latest report as it is clear that Ofsted see the school as we do.  Pupils, staff, parents and Governors are delighted that our continued hard work has paid dividends and we are all extremely pleased with this outcome.”

Chair of Governors at the School, Khalid Mahmood, said: “I am delighted that the continuing dedicated and hard work of staff has been rewarded and that the Inspector recognised that our children are making great progress.”

Coun Imran Khan, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Education, Employment and Skills, said:  “This is excellent news for Abbey Green.  Five consecutive Good Ofsted inspections is a fantastic achievement and all those who have worked so hard to bring about this result should be justly very proud.”

 

Council seeking sponsor for new social, emotional and mental health free school

Bradford Council is looking for a sponsor to run a new special free school for pupils with social, emotional and mental health (SEMH) needs.

The new school is being created in Bradford after the council successfully bid with partners in the district and neighbouring councils for Education and Skills Funding Agency funding.

The free school will offer whole life services based around excellent education, family care and work-life support with space for 72 pupils and a 12 bed residential facility.
Bradford Council is now inviting applications to run the new school.  The council is hosting an event this week to share its vision with prospective sponsors.

Representatives from Social Care,  Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and neighbouring local education authorities will also be attending.

The event takes place at the Ernest Saville Room in City Hall from 10am to 1pm on Friday September 22.

Applications to run the new school can be submitted at any time before noon on November 24 this year.  The Council cannot grant a deadline extension. Any organisation wanting to submit a bid should register their interest first.

The new school is set to be built on the former Rhodesway playing fields site on Lower Grange, Bradford.

Coun Imran Khan, Bradford Council’s executive member  for education, employment and skills, said: “This new free school will play a key role in our provision for pupils with special educational needs.  We are looking for an organisation which can fulfill our vision for a school which provides  whole life services based around excellent education, family care and work-life support. We believe this school can make a real difference to the lives of young people who will benefit from this support.”

Council seeks views on the expansion of Low Ash Primary

Bradford Council is consulting on its proposed plans to enlarge Low Ash Primary School in Wrose. 

The consultation begins on Friday 8 September and runs until 20 October. A full analysis will be carried out and a report with recommendations will be made to the Executive of the Council in December 2017. 

The proposal would see the expansion of the school building to enable the Published Admission Number (PAN) to be increased from 60 to 90 pupils.  The school currently has capacity for 420 children which would rise to 630 if this proposal is agreed. 

The demand for places in this area continues to increase particularly with regard to the number of housing developments approved or awaiting a decision.  Some homes have been completed and children have been accommodated in other recently expanded schools. 

Coun Imran Khan, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Education, Employment and Skills, said:  “Low Ash Primary is a popular school and usually receives more applications than it has places for. 

“The school has adequate space for it to be expanded, and subject to the consultation and appropriate planning permission, would look to commence the increased intake with effect from September 2019.” 

The consultation is on the Council’s consultation webpage and responses can be made in various ways: 

Ends 

Contact:  Nina Mewse, Senior Provision and Places Officer, T 01274 439346. 

Notes to Editors:

The link provided  above takes you to the current consultations page.  Please scroll down to : 

Consultation on the Expansion of Low Ash Primary School in order to increase the Published Admission Number.

Tim Peake’s spacecraft to land in Bradford

The spacecraft which transported Tim Peake, the UK’s first European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut, to and from the International Space Station, will be landing at the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford for public viewing from Wednesday, 27 September 2017.

The Soyuz TMA-19M capsule, complete with equipped interior and char marks on its outer body from its re-entry into the earth’s atmosphere, will displayed along with its 25m diameter parachute.

The display of the iconic craft will be accompanied by an inspiring and immersive range of activities, including the Space Descent VR experience, narrated by Tim Peake himself.  Space Descent VR uses Samsung Gear VR headsets to recreate the experience of travelling over the International Space Station (ISS) and the incredible 250-mile journey back down to earth inside the Soyuz TMA-19M.

The VR imagery has been created by the award-winning Alchemy VR studio for the Science Museum Group, and is experienced with the latest Samsung Gear VR headsets in a bespoke VR lounge inside the museum.

The museum’s October half-term activities (21 – 29 October) will also be dedicated to Tim Peake’s Principia mission, featuring out-of-this-world experiences such as astronaut-training, taking the helm at mission control and launching self-designed rockets. And the museum’s popular series of Lates events for adults returns on 28 September with an evening of interactive space-themed entertainment.

Museum director, Jo Quinton-Tulloch, said: “The Science Museum Group acquired the Soyuz TMA-19M capsule last year, and we’re the first venue to display it outside the capital. It’s hard to express how excited we are to be bringing it to Bradford. The Soyuz capsule represents one of history’s most incredible technological feats, and this is an unmissable opportunity for visitors young and old to see the craft that took Tim Peake all the way to the Space Station and back.”

Soyuz TMA-19M carried Peake and crewmates Yuri Malenchenko and Tim Kopra in ESA Expedition 46/47 to the ISS on 15 December 2015, returning on 18 June 2016. It was acquired last year by the Science Museum Group.

Commenting on the acquisition, ESA astronaut Tim Peake said: “You do become very attached to your spacecraft because it definitely does save your life. I’m absolutely delighted that my Soyuz spacecraft, the TMA-19M, is going to be returning here to the UK and may serve, hopefully, as inspiration for our next generation of scientists and engineers.

Details of visiting arrangements and special events, including the Space Descent VR experience and half-term activities at the National Science and Media Museum will be announced at a later date.

Space Descent VR with Tim Peake and the presentation of Tim Peake’s spacecraft have been made possible with support from Samsung and the generous co-operation of Tim Peake and the European Space Agency.

Soyuz_TMA-19M_in_space

Malaika’s Story…

 

When you first meet seven-year-old Malaika Azeem from Bradford, she appears to be a healthy little girl. But at only a few weeks old, Malaika was diagnosed with life-limiting Congenital Heart Disease, a condition that causes increased heart rate, shortness of breath, chest pain and mobility problems. Malaika is in need of round the clock care that often leaves mum Sanam struggling to cope.

Malaika also suffers from frequent cyanosis, which causes poor oxygenation of the blood, otherwise known as ‘blue episodes’, for which she requires immediate hospitalisation. For mum Sanam, the past six years have been a constant battle to find support for the family.

She explains:

“The last 12 months have been really stressful for us all. In January last year, Malaika underwent open-heart surgery and doctors were unsure as to whether she’d pull through. After the operation, I cared for Malaika myself, changing her tracheotomy at home, as well as managing her physiotherapy. Since then, she has had several severe blue episodes and endured repeated hospital stays.

“I’m lucky to have the support of my parents and sister, who live close by, but there are very few people I would trust with Malaika’s care. Although I’ve previously tried to access different services in Bradford, there are few who really understand Malaika’s condition. Because she looks normal, people don’t understand.”

The challenge of caring for Malaika 24 hours a day, seven days a week is made more difficult as Sanam must juggle Malaika’s needs with those of her three sisters. Nimrah 13, Romesa 10, and Saira 3. For them, family life revolves around Malaika’s medical care, meaning that weekend activities and time out together are almost impossible.

Sanam explains further.

“Planning outings is a huge struggle. In the past, when we’ve been out and about, Malaika has fallen or become ill, so when I’m looking at places to go I have to consider where is suitable for her, and what might happen if she is ill away from home.

“I often feel guilty not being able to spend time with the other children. They sometimes get upset at the amount of attention I give Malaika, but when she falls ill, they understand why she needs me so much. My eldest, Nimrah, acts as a mother, sister and friend. She will help to wash and change Malaika and is a huge support to me. I’ve always tried to be honest with them all about the reality of Malaika’s condition and we take each day as it comes.”

Sanam self-referred Malaika to Martin House in the summer of 2015, and was overjoyed when the family were invited to a special tour prior to their first stay: After their first stay at Martin House in November last year, the Bradford family are hopeful that, with the right support, life can become a little more manageable.

“Malaika loved her first visit to the hospice. When we got there she didn’t know where to look first, and was so excited saying, “look at this, look at that”. She didn’t want to come home at all! Before our first proper stay in November, Malaika had been very ill and I was barely sleeping. The stay came at just the right time for both of us.”

“The time we spent at Martin House was an extraordinary experience. It was so good to get away from everything. Going to the hospice gives me the chance to talk to other parents and realise I’m not alone – their children might have different needs but we are all in the same boat. I don’t need sympathy; it’s so wonderful to be able to speak to people who understand.”

“When I talk to people about the hospice, they assume it’s all about end of life care. But Martin House do everything. Malaika loves to sing, and when she last stayed, she made a CD of her singing nursery rhymes and other songs. When I listened to it, I was in tears! It’s building up these memories that’s so special, all the little things that we do together that mean so much.”

Malaika2

 

Thackley Primary School’s ‘Save a Heart Day’ campaign welcomes installation of lifesaving Defibrillator

Thackley Primary School has welcomed the arrival of a new life-saving piece of equipment.

Staff at the school received training to use the automated external defibrillator from Yorkshire Ambulance Service last week.

Head of School, Annette Patterson said:

“We are delighted to launch our school and local community defibrillator. This was paid for through our ‘Save a Heart Day’ fundraising event organised and led by the school.

“We recognised the importance of having a defibrillator in school and were driven to succeed in raising enough money to make it happen. We are thrilled and incredibly proud of our achievements.”

The school was also assisted by donations from the local community and businesses and was keen to get a defibrillator on their premises as they understand how important it is to provide early defibrillation when a person suffers a cardiac arrest.

The defibrillator works to restore the heart rhythm if a person goes into cardiac arrest and the earlier a defibrillator is used the better the chance of survival.

Michael Jameson, Bradford Council’s Strategic Director for Children’s Services said:

“Congratulations to both the staff and pupils and parents and carers at Thackley Primary School who helped to organise and raise funds for this wonderful, life-saving Defibrillator.”

“Not only will the school benefit from having a defibrillator, but also people in the local community and we hope it will save lives.”

Using Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) alone provides a five per cent chance of survival but early use of the defibrillator as well increases the chance of survival to over 50 per cent.

The machine could provide lifesaving care for people throughout Thackley and Idle.

Pictured: Headteacher, Trevor Patterson, Head of School, Annette Patterson, Teacher, Kate Bainbridge and Linda Milsom from the Yorkshire Ambulance Service.

Follow Thackley Primary School on Twitter: @ThackleyPrimary

Pupils learn safety message

Children at Dixon’s Marchbank Academy learned about the dangers of going onto building sites and into buildings to play.

Reshape Construction, a company involved in building social housing for Bradford Council recently visited the school to pass on information to the children about the dangers which construction sites pose, especially as the school holidays are now beginning and children have much more free time.

#educationcov

Partnership is the secret to success for group of inner-city Bradford schools

A partnership of neighbouring Bradford schools say joining forces is helping to drive up standards for the thousands of pupils across their postcode area.

The BD3 Achievement 4 All consists of ten primary schools, a special school, a secondary school and two children’s centres.All of the primary schools which have been inspected by Ofsted in the group have now been rated as being good .And the school leaders in the partnership say they are committed to driving further improvements with a major focus on improving pupils’ reading in key stage two as they reach the end of primary school.

The BD3 schools work together on a range of areas including reading, science, moderating each other’s marking and work, supporting newly qualified teachers and developing early years teaching.

For the past two years the partnership has been chaired by former Bradford headteacher Sara Rawnsley.

She said: “There is a deep commitment to work together for the benefit of everyone in the partnership.

“There are academies and council maintained schools, we have children’s centres, primaries, a special school and a secondary but everyone is open to working together and sharing what we do to drive improvement.”

The schools in BD3 Achievement 4 All are Peel Park Primary, Westminster CE Primary, Barkerend Primary, Byron Primary, Lapage Primary, Dixons Marchbank Primary, Killinghall Primary, Thornbury Primary, St Mary’s and St Peter’s Roman Catholic Primary, Feversham Primary, Delius Special School, Carlton Bolling College, Barkerend Children’s Centre and Mortimer House Children’s Centre.Peel Park Primary School, in Undercliffe, is one of the latest schools in the area to celebrate Ofsted success after it moved from Requires Improvement to Good in the inspection report published in May which praises all areas of its work.Byron Primary and Dixons Marchbank Primary also enjoyed success with good Ofsted reports this year while  Lapage Primary, St Mary’s & St Peter’s Roman Catholic Primary, Feversham Primary and Delius Special School are all rated as good as well.

Peel Park Headteacher Lloyd Mason Edwards said: “BD3 schools have worked in partnership for a long time but in recent years there has been a real focus on improving teaching and learning and improving attainment.

“There is a shared ethos across our schools and everyone is open to sharing what we do. I do think a lot of our success is down to the partnership. It has helped to improve our teaching and learning. We work together in lots of different areas.

“We have worked on professional development of our staff, special educational needs teaching and working on support for pupils who are new to English.”Gill Edge, the headteacher at Killinghall Primary School said another benefit of the partnership had been the way in which it allowed schools to to support new teachers starting their careers.

“Sara Rawnsley who chairs the partnership has developed school courses for newly qualified teachers and recently qualified teachers to support them in their first years in the job. This makes a real difference for the schools as it has meant we are retaining more of the teachers who start their careers in BD3. Retaining and developing teachers allows schools to develop a stable and established workforce which makes a real difference for us.”

Mrs Rawnsley added: “The courses provide mentoring and support to teachers starting their careers and it helps to improve their resilience and their ability to develop their practice. The partnership has meant that each year NQTs are part of a network of teachers who are starting together across BD3 schools. They are not on their own and feel a part of something bigger.

“By coming together with a shared focus for raising standards all of the schools and settings in our BD3 partnership are having a real impact on the lives of our young people.”

Coun Imran Khan, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Education, Employment and Skills said: “This shows what can be achieved when schools work in partnership. We know that across the Bradford district our school staff share the same passion and commitment to achieving the best outcomes for our young people.

“The BD3 Achievement 4 All partnership shows what can be achieved and as both executive member for education and as a local ward councillor I look forward to their future successes.”

Bradford SEND Conference is hailed a success

A major education conference held in Bradford focused on serving the needs of pupils with special educational needs and disability (SEND) has been hailed as a big success.

More than 600 representatives from schools across the district attended the event, which was organised by Bradford Council.

The audience at Bradford City’s Northern Commercial Stadium at Valley Parade heard keynote speeches from a panel of experts from the sector.

The “Putting Children at the Centre” – Bradford SEND conference 2017 also allowed the council to set out its vision for the district where Bradford moves towards a sector-led self improving model of SEND provision where best practice is shared between schools.

The event was aimed at headteachers, SENCOs (special educational needs co-ordinators) and SEND governors of all schools in the district, parents, partner agencies as well as staff from the further education sector.

Welcoming delegates to the event Bradford Council’s Strategic Director for  Children’s Services Michael Jameson said he believed that working together schools, the local authority and parents all had the expertise to provide the best possible support and education for pupils with SEND.

Bradford Council has well-developed relationships with schools and believes that continued collaboration will help transform the way in which specialist provision and support for SEND pupils is delivered.

The audience then heard from three top national speakers in SEND education.

Jane Friswell, a former chief executive of the Nasen (National Association of Special Educational Needs) charity and director of SEND Consultancy, focused on why “Good practice for students with SEND is good practice for all.” 

She told the conference that she was very impressed with the “quality of ambition” she had seen from Bradford for SEND provision.

Jean Gross CBE spoke about how to support learners with SEND through quality first teaching and Simon Knight, from the London Leadership, talked about School Based SEND Review, a nationally recognised review tool for evaluating how well a school is meeting the needs of SEND children which is being rolled out across the Bradford District next term.

The event also included a market place which allowed the council to promote the additional services that are available to support pupils with SEND in schools.

Coun Imran Khan, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Education, Employment and Skills said: “We are delighted with how this conference went. We have received so much positive feedback both from our schools and from the expert speakers who were kind enough to share their experience with us.

“Colleagues have told us that they were inspired by the speakers and that the event was a good opportunity to refresh their knowledge and learn new things. It gave people the chance to pick up on strategies to use in the classroom and the chance to network and share ideas with other colleagues.

“Bradford has a growing population and we know that there is a growing need for more specialist places in our schools. But what the conference shows is that there is a shared commitment from the council and schools to ensure that across the district the needs of these pupils can be met.”

St Matthew’s CE Primary pupils get taste of what the college has to offer

Year 6 pupils from St Matthew’s CE Primary, Bradford, were given a real taste of what’s on offer at Bradford College when they visited the campus.

Some 60 Year 6 pupils, 30 on each day, were given an extensive tour of the College on Thursday and Friday 13 and 14 July. They met with students who they had previously spent time with at school in November, 2016 and February this year. Known as College Ambassadors, they helped the pupils gain insights into a range a courses and careers, and into the general life of post-school study.

The pupils saw the engineering and technical workshops, science labs and library. From the top floor of the main building, they were able to see the Bradford cityscape. The day ended in a media studio where groups of pupils made a talk show video. They took on the roles of either hosts, guests, camera operators, sound engineers or directors. They are looking forward to seeing the short films.

Included in the tour was a visit to a hair salon, a boxing gym, and a statue of Sir Edward Appleton, who won a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1947 while working at the former Bradford Technical College, which later became Bradford College.

Last November students from the College answered questions from pupils about life as a student as part of a Year 6 Careers Week. The event was organised to encourage the pupils to have high aspirations and consider further and higher education once they leave secondary school.

A second session, called Your Future and Higher Education, was held at the school in February. It gave pupils an insight into studying Higher education and the students answered frequently asked questions about courses, entry requirements and the costs involved

The events were part of Bradford College’s Get Involved scheme which runs the College’s Further and Higher Education Progression Packages.

Picture shows pupil Aaqib Zaman on camera.