Category Archives: children

Bingley Music Live – what else is happening?

Bingley Music Live boasts more than just this year’s top name line-up – there is also a host of food stalls, bars, market stalls and a children’s area to explore.

People at the Bradford Council-run event at Bingley’s Myrtle Park on 1-3 September will be spending several hours on site, so the wide range of food and drink stalls is a good chance to refuel.

Restaurant and catering firm Zouk have won the catering contract for this year’s festival. They are offering 17 food stalls featuring Indian and Caribbean street food, Turkish, Chinese, wood-fired pizza, Mexican, fish and chips, Moroccan and burgers.

A wide range of alcohol and soft drinks will be served at the festival bar, including lager, cider, wine, spirits and sodas and cask ale is available at the Discovery Stage bar. For something a little different, there is a cocktail bar and a gin bar.

The Kids Zone area gives younger visitors the chance to let off some steam with activities including a Spider Mountain (climb and slide), party bouncer with slide, rodeo bull, den-building, play tent and sand.

For those who fancy a bit of shopping, there will be a ‘mini village’ among the trees of over 20 stalls. Their wares will include glitter face and body painting, ethically-sourced clothing and wearable art and jewellery. Official Bingley Music Live and band merchandise is also available to purchase from a stand in the middle of the site.

Special support can be found at the site’s Welfare Tent which will provide: a nappy change area, dedicated children’s toilet and Changing Places toilet (for people who cannot use standard accessible toilets), sun lotion and a lost children service.

The popular fancy dress feature returns this year, with blue theme which means people are invited to dress from top to bottom in blue.

Acts at this year’s festival include Manic Street Preachers, Kaiser Chiefs, The Wombats, Maximo Park, Badly Drawn Boy, Soul II Soul, Pete Doherty, Milburn, Feeder and many more. There is also a chance to see the big names of the future on the Discovery Stage.

Coun Sarah Ferriby, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Environment Sport & Culture, said: “With so much going on at Bingley Music Live, there is something to occupy everyone, to keep the children entertained and to keep everyone fed and watered. The fancy dress theme will also make for some fantastic photos.”

Tickets are now selling fast – please note that child weekend tickets and child Saturday tickets have all sold out. Tickets can be purchased via www.bingleymusiclive.com or Ticketline on 0844 8889991. Adult weekend tickets are £70 plus booking fee and child weekend tickets are £35 plus booking fee. Single day tickets are priced at £35 each for adults (plus booking fee) and £30 for children (plus booking fee). Adult day tickets are also available at Bingley Pool and Bradford and Saltaire Visitor Information Centres.

People can keep up to date on the event by following Bingley Music Live on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. #BMLive17

Pupils learn safety message

Children at Dixon’s Marchbank Academy learned about the dangers of going onto building sites and into buildings to play.

Reshape Construction, a company involved in building social housing for Bradford Council recently visited the school to pass on information to the children about the dangers which construction sites pose, especially as the school holidays are now beginning and children have much more free time.

#educationcov

Graduation party for nursery children

Children from Acorns Nursery in Eldwick, who will be leaving to begin school in September, are having a graduation party where the guest of honour will be Lord Mayor of Bradford, Coun Abid Hussain.

The private day nursery has arranged the party so that the children can celebrate their time at the nursery with their families and the staff before moving on to school.

The children will wear traditional graduation caps and gowns and will receive certificates marking their achievements at the nursery, at the ceremony on Tuesday 18 July. There will be a balloon release before they tuck in to a party lunch with their special guest.

One lucky child will also be made Mini Lord Mayor for the day and get to wear the city’s scaled-down Lord Mayoral robes,hat and chain of office.

Sophie Graham, Nursery Manager, said: “We look forward to this day every year as it gives the nursery and the parents a chance to celebrate the achievements made by all of the children at our pre-school. We are tremendously proud of the strong, resilient, independent and happy children they have become and we wish each and every one of them, the very best for the future as they start their new chapter at school.”

Peace Walk will celebrate diverse community around Miriam Lord Primary

Parents, local mosques and churches have been invited to join hundreds of pupils and staff on a Peace Walk to celebrate diversity in Bradford and around Miriam Lord Primary School.

The walk has been planned for Friday 21 July, 2017 and is being held following recent terrorist events in Manchester and London.

The Peace Walk was suggested by Year 6 teacher Stefanie Deciacco as an additional way of commemorating sad and tragic events. The school already discusses events, such as the Manchester terrorist attack, in class and has held Silences to honour the dead, bereaved and injured.

All 440 pupils and 45 staff will be involved in the walk which will end with the walkers singing Bob Marley favourite “One Love” in the school playground. A recording will be made and the song and played again on Miriam Lord Radio.

Leading up to the event, pupils will be involved in discussion about why the Peace Walk is taking place. They will also be making placards with peace slogans and a wide banner saying “Miriam Lord Primary Peace March” which will be at the front of the walk, so people passing by know what’s happening.

Bryan Harrison, Executive Headteacher at Miriam Lord, said: “With social media, children very quickly know what happens around the world. They are curious about events like the terrorist attack in Manchester and want to know more, but unfortunately, the messages they hear are not always unbiased.

“In school, we are always open to children’s questions and ready to talk about their worries. The purpose of the walk is to show that we are proud to be part of our community and to celebrate the diversity of the people who live in Bradford.”

Rhyme Challenge award winners

 

Those who made exceptional contributions to Bradford Council Libraries’ annual Rhyme Challenge received awards at a special event this week.

Over 3,500 families successfully completed this year’s challenge, ran by Bradford Libraries and Early Childhood Services at the council. It was put out to 300 childcare and library settings across the district. This year saw a 75 per cent increase in uptake.

The Rhyme Challenge, which ran between September 2016 and March 2017, sets children under five and their families the task of learning five rhymes. They then receive a certificate for their hard work.

Of those who took part in the challenge, 92 per cent of parents felt that it had increased their child’s speech and language development. Of the staff and volunteers who oversee the challenge in childcare, toddler groups and library settings, 100 per cent felt the challenge was beneficial to the families they work with.

The awards ceremony recognised the collective efforts of individuals and groups in organising the challenge and those who have gone the extra mile. The Lord Mayor of Bradford Coun Abid Hussain presented the awards and guest speaker was Christina Gabbitas, poet/author and winner of the Yorkshire Women of Achievement Award 2016.  Children from Netherleigh & Rossefield School Nursery School sang and there was a rhyme time session with Dave Morrison from BHT Education & Training

The award winners were:

Bradford Libraries Rhyme Challenge Best Practice Individual Award

  • Winner – Bridget Izod – Development Officer Support, Bradford Libraries
  • Runner up – Lois Partington –Foundation Stage Manager, Netherleigh & Rossefield School
  • Other nominations included: Jessika Osborne – Volunteer, Airedale & Wharfedale Children’s Centre Cluster

Bradford Libraries Rhyme Challenge Best Practice Libraries Award

  • Winner – Idle Library
  • Runner up – Keighley Library
  • Other nominations included: Bingley Library, City Library, Clayton Library, Eccleshill Library, Ilkley Library

Bradford Libraries Rhyme Challenge Best Practice Toddler Group Award

  • Winner – St Theresa’s Playgroup, Queensbury
  • Runner up – Buttershaw Christian Family Centre
  • Other nominations included: St Andrews See & Know Group and Wibsey Methodist Toddler Group

Bradford Libraries Rhyme Challenge Best Practice Setting Award

  • Winner – Fagley Primary School
  • Runner up – Sandy Lane Pre-School
  • Other nominations included: Al Hikmah School; BHT Early Education & Training; Copthorne Primary School; Greengates Primary School; Grove House Primary School Nursery; Highfield Pre-School; Lidget Green Primary School; Netherleigh & Rossefield Nursery School; Nightingales Day Nursery; Our Lady of Victories Primary School; St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School; Strong Close Nursery School; Wibsey Methodist Pre-School

Bradford Libraries Rhyme Challenge Best Practice Children’s Centre Award

  • Winner – South Bradford Children’s Centre Cluster
  • Runner up – Airedale & Wharfedale Children’s Centre Cluster
  • Other nominations included: Bradford West Children’s Centre Cluster and Lister Park Children’s Centre Cluster

Contact Bradford Libraries on 01274 433684 for more information on the Rhyme Challenge or check out www.bradford.gov.uk/libraries

Drive to find and support people who ‘privately foster’

Bradford Council is marking Private Fostering Week, which runs from 3 to 7 July, by reminding people to get in touch if they think a child is living with someone other than their parents or a close relative.

Private fostering is where a child lives with someone who is not their parent or a close relative, for longer than 28 days. This can be for a number of reasons including if the child’s parents are abroad or unwell, or if there are difficulties in the family.

Private foster care can be a very positive experience; however, the council needs to know about children and young people in these types of arrangements as they are potentially vulnerable as they are not living with their parents.

Bradford Council is particularly asking people who work with children to be aware of private fostering and to notify the council.

The council has produced a short film about private fostering that can be viewed here.  Messages are also being sent out in to the Polish, Slovakian and Czech communities through social media posts.

Coun Val Slater, Executive Member for Health and Wellbeing, said: “If you look after someone else’s child, or know of someone who does, we’re encouraging you to contact us.

“Ensuring all children are safe is a priority. Everyone should know what private fostering is and what you need to do if you think a child is living in this arrangement.”

People can contact Children’s Services on 01274 437500 or find out more at:

http://www.bradford.gov.uk/children-young-people-and-families/private-fostering/private-fostering/

More information about the national campaign is available at:

http://www.privatefostering.org.uk/

Notes

A private fostering arrangement is essentially one that is made without the direct involvement of a Local Authority for the care of a child under the age of 16 (or 18 if disabled) by someone other than a parent or close relative for 28 days or more.

A close relative is defined as “a grandparent, brother, sister, aunt or uncle (whether a full or half relative or by marriage or civil partnership) or step-parent.

Privately fostered children are a diverse and sometimes vulnerable group, which includes:

• children sent from abroad to stay with another family, usually to improve their educational opportunities

• teenagers who, having fallen out with their parents, are staying in short-term arrangements with friends or other non-relatives

• language students living with host families

‘Reading Matters’ brings together those passionate about Closing the Literacy Gap

A locally-based charity who work to improve reading skills and life chances for young people held their annual literacy conference last week.

This year’s conference was created to address the issue of ‘Closing the Literacy Gap’ and how to help children from disadvantaged backgrounds to achieve the same as their more fortunate peers.

Popular children’s authors, Tom Palmer and Andy Seed both presented at the conference speaking about ways to make reading more accessible for all children and the role that authors can play in igniting a love of reading.

The conference keynote speech was delivered by Bradford-born Matt Bromley, a leading education writer and consultant who was able to raise his own aspirations and academic achievement above those expected by his circumstances by becoming an avid reader.

Matt spoke of the importance of reading for pleasure on social mobility and how the “word rich” will inevitably become more affluent and the “word poor” more impoverished. He implored teachers, as those who have the “superpower” of being literate and loving books to pass it on and stressed the value of parents reading to their children at home.

The highlight of the day was when children from two Bradford schools – Dixon’s Kings Academy and Bowling Park Primary School spoke to the enthralled delegates about how their Reading Leaders training had helped them to improve the confidence and reading ability of their younger reading partners.

The Reading Leaders training which prepares older pupils to provide effective one to one reading support to the younger ones is a great way to engage children from disadvantaged backgrounds who often learn better from other young people.

The other expert speakers were Dr Paula Clarke of The University of Leeds who shared strategies for teaching language comprehension to support those that struggle, Deborah Bullivant of the Grimm and Co social enterprise in Rotherham that uses an apothecary shop as the inspiration for creative writing and Rachel Van Riel who shared tips on how to make library spaces for children as attractive and accessible as possible.

Workshops covered topics relevant to ‘Closing the Literacy Gap’ including the best support for those with English as an additional language and using comics to enhance learning.

Over 150 people attended the conference, mainly teachers from primary and secondary schools along with librarians, learning mentors and other education professionals with some travelling from as far as London to be part of this motivating event.

Rachel Kelly, Chief Executive of Reading Matters said: “It was a really inspiring and enjoyable day and it’s so great to bring together all these people who are dedicated to doing their best for children and helping them to reach their potential”.

Reading Matters has been helping young people to read with confidence and enthusiasm since 1997 and provides schools with Reading Mentors in South and West Yorkshire. Their accredited training courses are available nationwide for peer mentors, education professionals and parents.

The charity, which specialises in one to one reading support for young struggling and relucatant readers currently helps around 6,800 children each year with an average improvement in reading age of 13 months in just 10 hours.

For more information please see the charity’s website: www.readingmatters.org.uk

Follow Reading Matters on Twitter:  @reading_matters

 

 

District looks to develop its Early Help arrangements for families

Bradford Council plans to work with agencies across the District to extend ways in which it can provide Early Help for families who are in the greatest need of support.

Early Help is a way of giving families the support they need as quickly as possible when problems emerge. It means services working together to find solutions to small problems before they become big ones.

By taking this approach, the Council and its partners are able to:
• Provide the right help for those who need it most.
• Help families to help themselves where this is possible.
• Make sure limited resources are used in the best way possible.

The Early Help approach has already been developed for some services. The new proposals would look to extend this for a wider range of services for families and children and young people. This would include maternal health, parenting support, and early education take-up and ensuring young people have positive things to do. It would also look to tackle problem areas such as parental mental ill health, domestic violence and substance misuse

The proposals would look to bring different services closer together to improve information sharing and reduce duplication. This would provide clearer access to families most in need and would help them get more effective support. It would do this by:
• Improving how we deliver help so we can stop families getting stuck and help them make clear progress towards improved lives.
• Improving family support by making it clear what help is available.
• Making it easier for families to find services so they only have to tell their story once.
• Building on the Council’s Families First approach so we have one family, one plan and one key worker so we help families to receive the right support at the right time.
• Finding more ways to help families and communities help themselves.

The new model will look to deliver services more locally across a number of ‘clusters’. This is an approach that is already in place for some services such as children’s centres.

The Council plans to engage with families, partner organisations and staff over the summer about the best ways to deliver services before a more formal consultation on proposals takes place in the autumn.

Coun Val Slater, portfolio holder for health and wellbeing, said: “There are many families across our district who need help and support. Demand for this help is growing at a time when funding is reducing. This means we will need to do things differently in the future if we are to deliver the services that our communities need.

“These proposals will look at how all the agencies who deliver services can work together to provide better targeted help at the earliest opportunity when problems first emerge in a person’s life. This can offer better outcomes for children and families and can also help us avoid expensive care at a later stage. We want to talk to families and providers about the best ways we can deliver services.”

Cliffe Castle park parade

Around 250 children will take part in a costume parade to celebrate the completion of the refurbishment of Cliffe Castle Park, which has been made possible thanks to National Lottery players.

The children from six Keighley schools will march alongside Romans, Victorians and the ‘Spirit of the Future’ around the newly restored pond, marble fountains and new planting towards the glass show house on Thursday (29 June).

After learning about the contents of a recently recovered Victorian time capsule, the children took part in a workshop inside Cliffe Castle Museum to gain ideas from the exhibits of what to include in a new time capsule.

This will be presented to Bradford Lord Mayor Coun Abid Hussain before being buried for 50 years in the domed palm house.

The £4.5 million restoration of Cliffe Castle park is due to be completed by the end of next month with further celebrations planned.

Bradford Council successfully bid for £3.5 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund’s “Parks for People” programme to carry out the work which started a year ago.

The project has been designed with support from volunteers in the Cliffe Castle Park Conservation Group.

Coun Sarah Ferriby, Bradford Council Executive Member for Environment, Sport and Culture, said: “This promises to be a great day for our young people to enjoy the culmination of this amazing project and for the rest of us to appreciate the value of both the museum and park at Cliffe Castle.

“They are tremendous assets for Keighley and the wider district. They can both be used by local schools to support a whole range of ways that help classroom teaching.

“It’s marvellous to see everything coming together and the whole area starting to take shape in its full summer splendour.”

Schools taking part in the parade are: Eastwood Community School, Haworth Primary Academy, Merlin Top Primary Academy, Our Lady of Victories Catholic Primary, Riddlesden St Mary’s CE Primary, The Holy Family Catholic School.