Category Archives: care

Bradford cares

A new campaign – commissioned by the Safer and Stronger Communities Partnership and led by local charities – has launched to raise awareness and support for local organisations that help those who are rough sleeping and begging across the Bradford District.

Known as #BradfordCares, the initiative makes it straightforward and convenient to give money, items and time to local charities through a new website –

The website acts as an online hub where people can find information about all the services available in Bradford, adverts for volunteers and items needed, as well as locally relevant articles that inform people of issues surrounding homelessness in Bradford.

For anyone wishing to find out more and discuss issues surrounding homelessness in Bradford, an information stall promoting the campaign and engaging people with what local organisations are doing to help will be at Bradford Interchange (7.30am – 10.30am) and Bradford Broadway (3pm – 6pm) on Thursday 21 December.

Visit to find out how you can help people who rough sleep and beg.

Follow the campaign on social media with #BradfordCares

Feedback your ideas to help improve the initiative for future campaigns;



Kids provide life-saving boost

Staff and pupils at Thackley Primary School held a fundraising event to raise money for a life-saving defibrillator on Valentine’s Day this year.  ‘Save a Heart Day’ was such a great success the school managed to raise enough money for two life-saving machines.

The day involved a series of fundraising activities which included all the children coming to school wearing red or pink, a Valentine’s bun sale and a raffle for a teddy bear and Valentine’s hamper.

The school has also received donations from the local community and businesses.

Thackley Primary School welcomed the arrival of the new life-saving piece of equipment outside the school and have decided to donate the second defibrillator to nearby Thackley Cricket Club.

Executive Headteacher – Trevor Patterson, Head of School – Annette Patterson and KS1 Teacher – Kate Bainbridge presented the life-saving machine to Alan Cuff, Treasurer of Thackley Cricket Club.

Alan Cuff from Thackley Cricket Club said:  “I would like to thank everyone involved at Thackley Primary School and the local community for donating such a special and important piece of equipment to the club.”

Both kits will be available for the wider community to use in emergency situations.

Annette Patterson – Head of School at Thackley Primary School said: “We are delighted to be able to donate one of the life-saving defibrillators to Thackley Cricket Club for the local community to have access to.  Sudden cardiac arrest is the UK’s biggest killer but access to a defibrillator can increase a person’s chances of survival to between 70 and 90 per cent.

“We recognised the importance of having a defibrillator in both locations, our school and the local community – and were driven to succeed in raising enough money to make it happen. We are thrilled and incredibly proud of our achievements and very grateful to the children, parents and local community for their support.”

Michael Jameson, Bradford Council’s Strategic Director for Children’s Services said: “This is an excellent achievement by the pupils of Thackley Primary School who not only wanted to ensure that their peers at school had access to this life-saving equipment, but also the wider community.  Congratulations and well done to everyone involved.”

Free First Aid Awareness Training

Could you benefit from attending an informative event where you can receive free First Aid Awareness Training? Why not come to the Community Family Fun Day at the Carlisle Business Centre, Carlisle Road, BD8 8BD, on Saturday 2 December from 11am to 2.30pm.

Yorkshire Ambulance Service and NEESIE are running this partnership event, and the Ambulance Service, with their Recruitment and Apprenticeship Team, will be delivering the free First Aid Awareness Training to all.

Free lunch and a first come first served creche facility will allow mums and dads to sit back, relax and learn vital life skills!


Chewing gum campaign

Shoppers outside the Broadway shopping centre tomorrow (Thursday, 5 October) will see the launch of a new campaign to tackle the problem of chewing gum on pavements and roads.

Bradford Council will align with a national campaign organised by the Chewing Gum Action Group to change behaviour and make people think twice before dropping their gum on the floor.

Coun Sarah Ferriby, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Environment, Culture and Sport, said: “Dropped chewing gum is a significant messy problem for Bradford.

“It is very costly and time consuming to remove and the process of removing it can also damage the pavement or road.”

Since mid-July, eight private enforcement officers have been patrolling the streets of Bradford and issuing Fixed Penalty Notices to people who drop litter, urinate and spit, as well as Dog Control Order offences.

They have already fined people for discarding gum and the new campaign will explain that discarded chewing gum is litter.

Following the city centre launch, the campaign will be rolled out to Shipley and the rest of the district.

Coun Ferriby said: “This is a problem affecting every urban area. Bradford is no different than any other town or city.

“Chewing gum is harder to remove than litter that can be swept up, and this campaign is intended to raise awareness to people that chewing gum is litter – once it goes down on to the pavement it stays there.”

“It doesn’t look good, it’s sticky, it takes some removing and people may not realise that this type of littering is harder to remove.”

She added: “The solution is to put it in a piece of tissue, put it your pocket or put it in the bin.”

Council officers will be using posters, banners, lamppost stickers and other promotional material to try and raise awareness of the problem and to make people think about helping with the solution.


Stay Well this winter – getting the flu vaccination

Those at risk from the flu across the district are being asked to stay well this winter by getting their flu vaccination to protect themselves, and loved ones, this winter.

This year’s flu season has now started and those invited to get a flu vaccination, by their GP or employer, are being urged to take up the offer to prevent the spread of flu across the district.

GPs across the district are in the process of inviting people to have their flu injection. This includes all pregnant women, children aged 2 and 3, people aged 65 and over; and those with long term health conditions who are eligible.

People in the clinically ‘at risk’ groups are 11 times more likely to experience complications if they get the flu than a ‘healthy person’. This includes those suffering from heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen or neurological diseases, diabetes, stroke or a lowered immune system.

Anyone with a BMI over 40 will also qualify for a free flu vaccination.

All 2 and 3 year olds are being asked to take a safe and effective nasal spray vaccine to protect them and help prevent the spread of flu to family members. School Children in Reception and school Years 1 to 4 will also be able to get the nasal spray vaccine as part of a schools vaccination programme.

If you haven’t received a letter or are a main carer of an older or disabled person you should contact your GP to check if you qualify.

Anita Parkin, Head of Public Health for Bradford Council, says:

“If you receive a letter from your GP or employer, it’s because you need to protect yourself from the flu. Making an appointment to have a quick and simple vaccination is a lot quicker than suffering from the flu for several days.”

“It’s not just a cold. Flu is very contagious and can be a really serious illness. If you’ve been sent a letter it is because you are at higher risk from complications that can lead to hospitalisation, permanent disability or even death.

“Having your flu vaccine doesn’t just protect you; it helps stop the flu spreading to other people who may be even more vulnerable than yourself.”

Mary Law, Screening and Immunisation Manager at NHS England (West Yorkshire) said:

“Even if you’ve already had a flu jab in previous years, you need another one this year. This is because the viruses that cause flu are always changing.

“We would particularly encourage older people, adults and children in at risk groups and mums-to-be to make sure they have their flu jab to protect themselves.

“For mums–to–be this protects themselves and their unborn babies as flu can lead to serious complications in pregnant women. National guidance states the vaccine is safe throughout pregnancy and can protect newborn babies up to about four to six months from birth.”

For most healthy people not in at risk groups, flu remains a mild illness and generally they will recover in a few days after getting lots of rest, drinking plenty of fluids and using over-the-counter remedies such as paracetamol.

You can also prevent the spread of the virus by always carrying a tissue and using them to catch coughs or sneezes, disposing of the tissue and then washing your hands.

If you aren’t getting any better then stay at home and call your doctor or call 111 for non-urgent medical advice.”

The vaccine for all children aged 2-17 is a safe and effective nasal spray which provides a more effective protection against flu vaccination in this age group. Children, who are allergic to eggs, have severe asthma or a severely weakened immune system will be offered an injection.

Selected local pharmacies are also offering the flu vaccination free to at risk groups who are registered with a GP. Anyone not at risk can also get the injection, although a charge will apply.

Those eligible for the Flu vaccinations:

  • everyone aged 65 years or over
  • all pregnant women, at any stage of pregnancy
  • All those aged two and three years old on 31 August 2017
  • All children in reception class and school years one, two, three and four
  • Everyone from six months to less than 65 years of age who has a serious medical conditions: chronic respiratory disease, heart disease, kidney disease at stage 3, 4 or 5, liver disease, splenic dysfunction, neurological disease or diabetes a weakened immune system due to disease or treatment
  • everyone living in a residential or nursing home
  • everyone who cares for an older or disabled person
  • all frontline health and social care workers
  • anyone with a BMI above 40

The list above is not exhaustive and if you are still unsure, ask your doctor.

For more information on seasonal flu or vaccinations visit NHS Choices:

30 hours update – Parents who have applied for a code but not received one

The DfE has informed the LA that a small number of parents who have applied before 31 August may receive their 30 hours code between 1 and 14 September, because HMRC required additional information before determining their eligibility (‘amber’ cases).

In these circumstances, providers should be satisfied that a parent applied for a 30 hour code by 31 August before offering a 30 hours place. For example, a parent might demonstrate that they applied before 31 August through sharing the information contained within their childcare account mailbox and secure message that will state when they were identified as an amber case, and the date they received the message.

Bradford LA will fund a 30 hours place for these parents for the autumn term where they have received a code from HMRC with a validity start date after 31 August and up to 14 September.

As previously advised, a parent can reserve a place for their child the term after their third birthday with their chosen provider prior to their code being checked, but the code must be checked via the Funded Hours Checker before the child can take up their funded place. If providers choose to allow parents to start the place prior to validating the code, it will be at the provider’s own risk should the parent prove to be ineligible.

The DfE has also stated that the childcare service helpline is now able to provide a temporary code to eligible parents experiencing on-going technical issues. Please encourage parents to contact the helpline on 0300 123 4097, who will check eligibility and provide them with a code if they qualify for 30 hours in the event that they cannot resolve their issue with their on-line application.

Malaika’s Story…


When you first meet seven-year-old Malaika Azeem from Bradford, she appears to be a healthy little girl. But at only a few weeks old, Malaika was diagnosed with life-limiting Congenital Heart Disease, a condition that causes increased heart rate, shortness of breath, chest pain and mobility problems. Malaika is in need of round the clock care that often leaves mum Sanam struggling to cope.

Malaika also suffers from frequent cyanosis, which causes poor oxygenation of the blood, otherwise known as ‘blue episodes’, for which she requires immediate hospitalisation. For mum Sanam, the past six years have been a constant battle to find support for the family.

She explains:

“The last 12 months have been really stressful for us all. In January last year, Malaika underwent open-heart surgery and doctors were unsure as to whether she’d pull through. After the operation, I cared for Malaika myself, changing her tracheotomy at home, as well as managing her physiotherapy. Since then, she has had several severe blue episodes and endured repeated hospital stays.

“I’m lucky to have the support of my parents and sister, who live close by, but there are very few people I would trust with Malaika’s care. Although I’ve previously tried to access different services in Bradford, there are few who really understand Malaika’s condition. Because she looks normal, people don’t understand.”

The challenge of caring for Malaika 24 hours a day, seven days a week is made more difficult as Sanam must juggle Malaika’s needs with those of her three sisters. Nimrah 13, Romesa 10, and Saira 3. For them, family life revolves around Malaika’s medical care, meaning that weekend activities and time out together are almost impossible.

Sanam explains further.

“Planning outings is a huge struggle. In the past, when we’ve been out and about, Malaika has fallen or become ill, so when I’m looking at places to go I have to consider where is suitable for her, and what might happen if she is ill away from home.

“I often feel guilty not being able to spend time with the other children. They sometimes get upset at the amount of attention I give Malaika, but when she falls ill, they understand why she needs me so much. My eldest, Nimrah, acts as a mother, sister and friend. She will help to wash and change Malaika and is a huge support to me. I’ve always tried to be honest with them all about the reality of Malaika’s condition and we take each day as it comes.”

Sanam self-referred Malaika to Martin House in the summer of 2015, and was overjoyed when the family were invited to a special tour prior to their first stay: After their first stay at Martin House in November last year, the Bradford family are hopeful that, with the right support, life can become a little more manageable.

“Malaika loved her first visit to the hospice. When we got there she didn’t know where to look first, and was so excited saying, “look at this, look at that”. She didn’t want to come home at all! Before our first proper stay in November, Malaika had been very ill and I was barely sleeping. The stay came at just the right time for both of us.”

“The time we spent at Martin House was an extraordinary experience. It was so good to get away from everything. Going to the hospice gives me the chance to talk to other parents and realise I’m not alone – their children might have different needs but we are all in the same boat. I don’t need sympathy; it’s so wonderful to be able to speak to people who understand.”

“When I talk to people about the hospice, they assume it’s all about end of life care. But Martin House do everything. Malaika loves to sing, and when she last stayed, she made a CD of her singing nursery rhymes and other songs. When I listened to it, I was in tears! It’s building up these memories that’s so special, all the little things that we do together that mean so much.”



Spotlight on Martin House Hospice

Martin House Hospice near Wetherby, opened its doors as the North’s first purpose-built hospice for children and young people in 1987. This year will mark its 30th Anniversary. Over that time, it has supported over 2000 children with life-shortening illnesses from across the Yorkshire region.

Nearly a third of the children cared for by Martin House come from the Bradford District, and the hospice community nurses spend a large amount of time supporting those families in their homes or in hospitals in and around the district.

For those who wish, there is also the opportunity for families  to come to stay at the  hospice near Wetherby, set in six acres of landscaped gardens, for planned respite care to allow them time to rest and spend quality time together as a family, or for emergency care, symptom control or end-of-life care if needed. Families who have lost a child can be supported by bereavement visitors; they can access that service even if they haven’t been to Martin House before.

To celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Martin House, they will be holding a family-friendly event with their inflatable art installation at Delius Arts and Cultural Centre on 23rd August.

To find out more about the event and Martin House, visit the website: or call 01937 845045 or on the Bradford local offer website.


Pupils learn safety message

Children at Dixon’s Marchbank Academy learned about the dangers of going onto building sites and into buildings to play.

Reshape Construction, a company involved in building social housing for Bradford Council recently visited the school to pass on information to the children about the dangers which construction sites pose, especially as the school holidays are now beginning and children have much more free time.


Graduation party for nursery children

Children from Acorns Nursery in Eldwick, who will be leaving to begin school in September, are having a graduation party where the guest of honour will be Lord Mayor of Bradford, Coun Abid Hussain.

The private day nursery has arranged the party so that the children can celebrate their time at the nursery with their families and the staff before moving on to school.

The children will wear traditional graduation caps and gowns and will receive certificates marking their achievements at the nursery, at the ceremony on Tuesday 18 July. There will be a balloon release before they tuck in to a party lunch with their special guest.

One lucky child will also be made Mini Lord Mayor for the day and get to wear the city’s scaled-down Lord Mayoral robes,hat and chain of office.

Sophie Graham, Nursery Manager, said: “We look forward to this day every year as it gives the nursery and the parents a chance to celebrate the achievements made by all of the children at our pre-school. We are tremendously proud of the strong, resilient, independent and happy children they have become and we wish each and every one of them, the very best for the future as they start their new chapter at school.”