Tag Archives: family

Heritage Day at Keighley Library

Visitors to Keighley can discover more about the town’s heritage at Keighley Library this coming weekend.

The annual Heritage Day at Keighley Library will take place on Saturday, 9 September.

There will be local, family, schools and military stands and this year the event will take on a musical theme reflecting Keighley’s musical heritage.

People can meet local and family history groups including Keighley Local History Society, Keighley Family History Society, Men of Worth, Keighley Schools Heritage and Airedale and Haworth writers.

At 11am there will be a special Rhymetime for children of all ages with guest presenters ‘Little Notes’.  The sing-along will feature woodwind instruments and fun and games.

From 11am until 4pm there will be music from local musicians Foxes Faux, Dayner Sim and Niamh Mirfield and Keighley group The Presidents.

There will be displays of Keighley’s musical heritage since the 1950s from the local studies library collections.

At 1pm musician and historian Gary Cavanagh author of ‘Noise of the Valleys’ will give a talk with musical clips from the CD that accompanies the book.

Coun Sarah Ferriby, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Environment, Sport and Culture, said:  “People can drop in throughout the day and discover more about the heritage of the local area.”

Admission to the event is free and everyone is welcome.

Malaika’s Story…

 

When you first meet seven-year-old Malaika Azeem from Bradford, she appears to be a healthy little girl. But at only a few weeks old, Malaika was diagnosed with life-limiting Congenital Heart Disease, a condition that causes increased heart rate, shortness of breath, chest pain and mobility problems. Malaika is in need of round the clock care that often leaves mum Sanam struggling to cope.

Malaika also suffers from frequent cyanosis, which causes poor oxygenation of the blood, otherwise known as ‘blue episodes’, for which she requires immediate hospitalisation. For mum Sanam, the past six years have been a constant battle to find support for the family.

She explains:

“The last 12 months have been really stressful for us all. In January last year, Malaika underwent open-heart surgery and doctors were unsure as to whether she’d pull through. After the operation, I cared for Malaika myself, changing her tracheotomy at home, as well as managing her physiotherapy. Since then, she has had several severe blue episodes and endured repeated hospital stays.

“I’m lucky to have the support of my parents and sister, who live close by, but there are very few people I would trust with Malaika’s care. Although I’ve previously tried to access different services in Bradford, there are few who really understand Malaika’s condition. Because she looks normal, people don’t understand.”

The challenge of caring for Malaika 24 hours a day, seven days a week is made more difficult as Sanam must juggle Malaika’s needs with those of her three sisters. Nimrah 13, Romesa 10, and Saira 3. For them, family life revolves around Malaika’s medical care, meaning that weekend activities and time out together are almost impossible.

Sanam explains further.

“Planning outings is a huge struggle. In the past, when we’ve been out and about, Malaika has fallen or become ill, so when I’m looking at places to go I have to consider where is suitable for her, and what might happen if she is ill away from home.

“I often feel guilty not being able to spend time with the other children. They sometimes get upset at the amount of attention I give Malaika, but when she falls ill, they understand why she needs me so much. My eldest, Nimrah, acts as a mother, sister and friend. She will help to wash and change Malaika and is a huge support to me. I’ve always tried to be honest with them all about the reality of Malaika’s condition and we take each day as it comes.”

Sanam self-referred Malaika to Martin House in the summer of 2015, and was overjoyed when the family were invited to a special tour prior to their first stay: After their first stay at Martin House in November last year, the Bradford family are hopeful that, with the right support, life can become a little more manageable.

“Malaika loved her first visit to the hospice. When we got there she didn’t know where to look first, and was so excited saying, “look at this, look at that”. She didn’t want to come home at all! Before our first proper stay in November, Malaika had been very ill and I was barely sleeping. The stay came at just the right time for both of us.”

“The time we spent at Martin House was an extraordinary experience. It was so good to get away from everything. Going to the hospice gives me the chance to talk to other parents and realise I’m not alone – their children might have different needs but we are all in the same boat. I don’t need sympathy; it’s so wonderful to be able to speak to people who understand.”

“When I talk to people about the hospice, they assume it’s all about end of life care. But Martin House do everything. Malaika loves to sing, and when she last stayed, she made a CD of her singing nursery rhymes and other songs. When I listened to it, I was in tears! It’s building up these memories that’s so special, all the little things that we do together that mean so much.”

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Spotlight on Martin House Hospice

Martin House Hospice near Wetherby, opened its doors as the North’s first purpose-built hospice for children and young people in 1987. This year will mark its 30th Anniversary. Over that time, it has supported over 2000 children with life-shortening illnesses from across the Yorkshire region.

Nearly a third of the children cared for by Martin House come from the Bradford District, and the hospice community nurses spend a large amount of time supporting those families in their homes or in hospitals in and around the district.

For those who wish, there is also the opportunity for families  to come to stay at the  hospice near Wetherby, set in six acres of landscaped gardens, for planned respite care to allow them time to rest and spend quality time together as a family, or for emergency care, symptom control or end-of-life care if needed. Families who have lost a child can be supported by bereavement visitors; they can access that service even if they haven’t been to Martin House before.

To celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Martin House, they will be holding a family-friendly event with their inflatable art installation at Delius Arts and Cultural Centre on 23rd August.

To find out more about the event and Martin House, visit the website: www.martinhouse.org.uk or call 01937 845045 or on the Bradford local offer website.

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Final line-up for Bingley Music Live

The stellar line-up for Bingley Music Live 2017 has now been completed and is looking like the strongest in the festival’s history.

New additions to the line-up come in the form of heavy hitting artists such as Sundara Karma, Badly Drawn Boy and Twin Atlantic who will be taking to the main stage across the weekend.

Music fans will also have the chance to catch some of the UK’s hottest new acts on this year’s Discovery stage, headlined by over-night sensation Tom Grennan, London gals The Big Moon and hotly tipped locals The Orielles.

They are joining an already full-to-bursting weekend programme for the Bradford Council-run event on 1-3 September at Myrtle Park which so far boasts Manic Street Preachers, The Kaiser Chiefs, The Wombats, Maximo Park, Pete Doherty, Soul II Soul, Feeder, Milburn and Cabbage.

Up and coming indie rockers Sundara Karma hail from Reading and have been compared to Arcade Fire and U2. Their debut album, the sagely titled ‘Youth is only even fun in Retrospect’ was released in January.

Damon Gough a.k.a Badly Drawn Boy celebrated the 15th Anniversary of his Mercury Prize winning album The Hour of the Bewilderbeast last year. The critically acclaimed debut album catapulted the artist into the spotlight with tracks like ‘The Shining’ and ‘Everybody’s Stalking’, he then went on to soundtrack the hugely successful Hugh Grant film ‘About A Boy’. Q Magazine have named Badly Drawn Boy as one of their ‘50 Bands to See Before You Die’.

Glasgow’s Twin Atlantic formed in 2000 and came to prominence in 2007 with their debut EP ‘A Guidance from Colour’, as well as support slots with the likes of Smashing Pumpkins and Blink-182. Their most successful singles so far have been ‘Heart and Soul’ and ‘Brothers and Sisters’, both from their 2015 album ‘Great Divide’. They were also named ‘Best UK Band’ at the 2016 SSE Scottish Music Awards. Their fourth studio album ‘GLA’ was released in September 2016.

Steve Hartley, Bradford Council’s Strategic Director, Place, said: “This year’s line up is looking better than ever and tickets are already being snapped up. We are on course for a fantastic late summer festival for 2017.”

The final phase of tickets are now available via Ticketline and available from the festival website www.bingleymusiclive.com

Weekend tickets are selling fast. Get your tickets for £60 as from Monday, 12 June, adult weekend tickets will be priced at £70.

The Council has joined forces with Bradford and Bingley Rugby Club to provide this year’s camping facilities – more details can be found on the festival website.

For the full festival line-up, updates and the latest information follow us on:

Twitter: @BingleyFestival

Facebook @bingleymusiclive

Instagram thebingleymusiclivefestival #BML17 Hashtag.

Memorial service to mark the 32nd anniversary of the Bradford City fire

Thursday, May 11 marks the 32nd anniversary of the Bradford City AFC fire disaster at Valley Parade.

The Lord Mayor of Bradford, Coun Geoff Reid, will attend the memorial service on Thursday, 11 May to remember the 56 people who died in the disaster in 1985.

The Mayor and Mayoress of Lincoln will represent the city of Lincoln at the event. Bradford City were playing Lincoln City in their last home match of the season in 1985 when the fire ripped through the ground killing 54 Bradford City fans, two Lincoln City fans and injuring many more.

The service which starts at 11am will be conducted by the chaplain to Bradford City AFC, the Reverend Andy Greiff and the Lord Mayor’s chaplain Reverend Canon Sarah Jemison and supported by the Venerable Andy Jolley, Archdeacon of Bradford.

The service, which is attended by the relatives and friends of those who lost their lives or were injured, as well as local people, takes place at the Bradford City Fire Memorial sculpture in Centenary Square.

There will be a reading from the Bible and prayers will be led by the Reverend Canon Paul Maybury, Precentor at Bradford Cathedral, before the act of remembrance which will include a minute’s silence.

The Lord Mayor of Bradford will lead a wreath laying ceremony by laying a wreath on behalf of the city and the district. Wreaths will also be laid by the Mayor of Lincoln, a representative for Bradford City AFC, bereaved families and the West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service. Once these wreaths have been laid, others who wish to lay their own wreaths or floral tributes are welcome to do so.

Following the laying of floral tributes, ‘Abide with Me’ will be sung by those present.

Fire engines will be parked on Centenary Square for the duration of the service and as with previous years, a garland of flowers will be placed on the “Memorial Bell” at the top of the civic staircase in City Hall. The bell was donated to the city by the fire service as it came from the first fire engine to arrive on the scene on the 11 May 1985.

The Lord Mayor of Bradford, Coun Geoff Reid, said: “It is extremely important to the city and the district that we take time out of our busy lives to remember those who were affected and continue to be affected by the tragic events of 11 May 1985. This act of remembrance is so poignant each year and is even more so this year, due to the loss of Gerald Hodges, one of the three trustees who helped set up the Bradford City fire charitable trust, who died in April this year.”

 

A Grand Day Out at Bradford Industrial Museum

A free science-themed day at Bradford Industrial Museum is being held for families on May Bank Holiday Monday.

The museum’s annual ‘Grand Day Out’ event will feature family activities and presentations on the theme of science and technology in every day life – from work to entertainment.

Activities, running from 10-4pm on Monday 1 May, will include a workshop by Sublime Science explaining how science can seem like magic.

Zoolab’s animal rangers will also visit to explain the biology of plants and animals.  Children will be able to carry out experiments in the museum’s galleries and make models using principles of physics and chemistry.

There will be craft activities, trails, demonstrations and working machinery in the museum’s Victorian Spinning Mill, Motive Power Gallery and Blacksmith’s workshop.

 

Initiative to promote healthy bedtime routine for young children

Bradford Libraries & Children’s Centres will celebrate Booktrust’s Bath, Book, Bed campaign during 24 to 30 April with over 25 events including Peppa Pig themed activities and rhyme times.

Book Trust’s campaign puts stories firmly at the centre of a good night’s sleep.  They feel that Bath Book Bed is the answer all parents/carers of young children have been looking for.

Hirst Wood Children’s Centre and others are thrilled to be taking part in the campaign and have lots of plans including water bubbles, bathing dolls, using sensory items like lavender and getting the children dressed up in their pyjamas.

Amongst other events Wyke, City & Bingley libraries will be taking up the Peppa Pig theme with rhymetimes, Peppa masks and dress up and a special activity storyboard at Wyke with Peppa and George characters that can be in the bath, in bed etc.

The full list of events is outlined below:

  • Fagley Children’s Centre 9.00am to 10.00am on Monday, 24 April – Messy Play
  • Menston Children’s Centre 9.15am to 10.45am on Monday, 24 April – Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Baildon Children’s Centre 9.15am to 10.45am on Monday, 24 April – Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Barkerend Children’s Centre 9.30am to 11am on Monday, 24 April – Messy Play
  • Rainbow Children’s Centre, Keighley 9.30am to 11am on Monday, 24 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Mortimer House Children’s Centre, Thornbury 1pm to 2pm on Monday, 24 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • Eccleshill Library 2pm on Monday, 24 April – Goodnight Maisy storytime, rhymes and craft.
  • Idle Library 2pm to 3pm on Monday, 24 April – Storytime with “Dinosaurs don’t do bedtimes” – children can wear pyjamas at this event
  • Bingley Library 10.30am on Tuesday, 25 April – Peppa Pig themed Rhymetime.
  • Hirstwood Children’s Centre 9am to 10.45am on Tuesday, 25 April –  Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Menston Children’s Centre 9.15am to 11am on Tuesday, 25 April –  Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Gateway Children’s Centre, Thorpe Edge 9.30am to 11.00am on Tuesday, 25 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • Mortimer House Children’s Centre 10.00am to 11.30am on Tuesday, 25 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • Barkerend Children’s Centre 9.30am to 11.30am on Tuesday, 25 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • Shipley Library 2pm on Tuesday, 25 April –  Bedtime stories and hanging mobile craft activity.
  • Strong Close Children’s Centre, Keighley 9.30am to 11.30am on Tuesday, 25 April – Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Community Works Children’s Centre, Undercliffe 10.30am to 12noon on Tuesday, 25 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • Highfield Children’s Centre, Keighley 10am to 11.30am on Tuesday, 25 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Daisy Chain Children’s Centre, Silsden 9.30am to 11.30am on Tuesday, 25 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Low Fold Children’s Centre, Keighley  1.15pm to 2.45pm on Tuesday, 25 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Burley Library 1.45pm on Tuesday, 25 April – Bath Book Bed Bear Event with Sleeping Teddy Craft.
  • St Stephens Church, Keighley 9.30am to 10.30am on Wednesday, 26 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Keighley Library 11am on Wednesday, 26 April –  Bedtime stories and hanging mobile craft activity.
  • Tree Tops, Haworth 10am to 11.30am on Wednesday, 26 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Community Works Children’s Centre 1pm to 2.30pm on Wednesday, 26 April – Messy Play
  • Cottingley Cornerstones Centre 1pm to 3pm on Wednesday, 26 April –  Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Tree Tops, Haworth 10.00am to 11.30am on Thursday, 27 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Fagley Children’s Centre 1pm to 3pm on Thursday, 27 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • Bangladeshi Community Centre, Keighley – 1.15pm to 2.45pm on Thursday,  27 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play.
  • Baildon Library 2.30pm on Thursday, 27 April –  Peppa Pig themed Rhymetime.
  • Little Lane Children’s Centre, Ilkley 1.30pm – 3pm on Thursday, 27 April –  Bath Book Bed Let’s Play.
  • Daisy Chain Children’s Centre, Silsden 2.15pm to 3pm on Thursday, 27 April – Bath Book Bed Music & Rhyme.
  • Wyke Library, 10am on Friday, 28 April – Peppa’s Bedtime Fun.
  • Low Fold Children’s Centre, Keighley 9.15am to 10.45am on Friday,  28 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play
  • Rainbow Children’s Centre, Keighley 10am to 11.30am on Friday, 28 April – Bath Book Bed Stay & Play
  • Parkland Children’s Centre, Idle 1pm to 3pm on Friday, 28 April – Teddy Bear Sleepover
  • City Library 11am on Saturday, 29 April – Stories and Peppa Pig mask & dress up

All parents/carers worry about getting young children to sleep at night – and of course getting enough sleep themselves. But it doesn’t have to be a bedtime battle. Reading a book before bed as part of a regular nightly routine is the perfect way to get your little one ready to visit the land of nod. Bath, Book, Bed is all you need to remember.

The UK’s largest children’s reading charity BookTrust have also launched a free new booklet featuring the top tips and advice of TV parenting expert Jo Frost of as part of their Bath, Book, Bed campaign: an initiative encouraging families to make stories part of every child’s bedtime routine.

Research* has shown that bedtime routines are associated with improved sleep in young children. Benefits include earlier bedtimes, shorter amount of time in bed before falling asleep, less night-wakings and longer sleep duration. And regular language-based bedtime routines such as singing, reading, or storytelling are associated with children’s increased sleep duration and improved cognitive skills.

But it doesn’t stop there. The same routine every night involving a story and shared reading won’t just help them fall asleep – it will also feed their imagination, creativity and confidence. Children who are read to every night start school ahead of those who aren’t – and the gap only widens as they get older.

Parents/carers can pick up their free copy of the new Bath, Book, Bed booklet from Libraries & Children’s Centres. The booklet can also be downloaded from the BookTrust website which features a Best Bedtime Books list and has lots more ideas, guidance and practical tips on ensuring stories are part of every child’s bedtime routine.

 

Visit www.booktrust.org.uk/bathbookbed  to find out more about the campaign.

*Research shows that a regular nightly bedtime routine is associated with improved sleep in young children; regular reading, singing or storytelling at bedtime are also associated with children’s increased sleep duration and improved cognitive skills. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine argues that positive bedtime routines involve a regular sequence of pleasurable and calming activities before a child goes to sleep – including a soothing bath, brushing teeth and reading a bedtime story (Mindell et al, 2015). At BookTrust we also know that sharing books with your child is a wonderful way to improve their literacy, confidence and wellbeing.

Visit www.bradford.gov.uk/libraries for information on libraries and events.

Take the kids to Wonderlab at the National Science and Media Museum

Can you hear the vibration?
Can you hear the vibration?

The new, state-of-the-art interactive gallery at the National Science and Media Museum is now open and invites children to become scientists through the interactive exhibits featuring the science behind light, sound and images.

With more than 20 mind-blowing attractions, Wonderlab is a wonderful place to take the kids!

The gallery features a massive mirror maze, a 15m echo tube and a musical laser tunnel, as well as the world’s first permanent 3D-printed zoetrope.

Children can turn their entire body into a corkscrew on a giant screen, take a selfie showing their face through a drop of water and shout and scream into a colossal echo tube the length of an articulated lorry!

Throughout your visit there are live experiments taking place, extraordinary experiences allowing visitors to explore the stunning science of light and sound.

Entry to Wonderlab is free but it is recommended that families book in advance through the website: www.scienceandmediamuseum.org.uk/wonderlab

The museum has also confirmed it will host the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft that carried Major Tim Peake to the International Space Station and back to earth.

Visitors will be able to see it in September when it travels outside London for the first time since it was acquired by the Science Museum Group last year.

St Matthew’s CE Primary School launch ‘Fuel for Schools’

Pupils at St Matthew’s CE Primary School have become young market traders as part of a project they hope will reduce food waste as well as help local families.

‘Fuel for School’ is a ground-breaking initiative using food destined for landfill to feed its pupils and nourish its community.

An empty stomach is widely understood to negatively affect to a child’s academic performance, impacting concentration and energy levels. It has been said that children who eat breakfast are more likely to have higher school grades than those who do not.

The school, in the Little Horton is taking part in the project for a whole school year to make an impact on the pupils’ education, further increase engagement with families and sell food on a pay-as-you-feel basis.

It will mean families will be able to buy perfectly good food for a reduced price.

Run by the Real Junk Food Project in Leeds, Fuel for Schools works with supermarkets and local food providers to intercept food reaching its sell-by date before it is thrown out.

Pupils hosted their first market stall last week which took place at the end of the school day.  Pupils sold a wide variety of items, from fruit and veg to crisps and juice.

The event was well received by families, and any remaining food will be offered to needy local families.

Funds raised by the school through the markets will be used to buy playtime equipment so the children can stay healthy through active play.

As part of the project, Year 5 pupils sort out the food, help families with their shopping and share information with the local community about food waste.

Kay Remmer, Acting Headteacher, said: “Our Year 5 children are really excited about the Fuel for School project.

“Like other schools involved in the project, we expect one of the outcomes will be a real impact on education.

“In other schools, Fuel for School has shown it can deliver improvement in things like maths and reading, behaviour and attitudes to others.

“Fuel for School will help us reduce the amount of resources thrown away unnecessarily, engage more with families and help the local community by providing food at low cost. At the market stall, families offer an amount of money which they feel is appropriate for the item.”

Adrian Stygall, School Business and Development Officer, said: “The first market went down really well, we sold about four fifths of the food. Any non-perishable food left over will go to the market next week, and other food will go to any local families in difficult circumstances.

“We hope that because of these markets, families facing problems in this difficult economic climate will be able to have a nice meal.”

Although the project will run to the end of the school year, he added: “We expect this project will go on for a long time.”

Follow St Matthew’s CE Primary on Twitter: @stmatthewsce

 

Bradford Hub boosts development with Early Language and Literacy Project

A joint early years project in Bradford has raised low development levels in reception-aged children.

The Early Language and Literacy Project was created by our Early Childhood Services and the National Literacy Trust’s Bradford Hub, in partnership with the Bradford Birth to 19 Teaching School Alliance and the Innovation Centre Bradford (TICB). The project was rolled out to eight Bradford primary schools, with children’s centres across the district also being invited to take part, which promoted opportunities for joint working and information sharing between them and the schools.

The programme had a significant impact on the eight Bradford schools who took part.

Across the eight schools:

  • The number of children achieving a Good Level of Development (GLD) score increased by an average of 9%, which is more than double the LA increase
  • The Good Level of Development scores across the eight schools increased by 12%
  • The gap between boys and girls achieving a Good Level of Development score narrowed by 18%

The programme was launched in response to the low GLD scores achieved by Bradford children, an issue which was particularly pronounced in schools in Bradford’s most deprived neighbourhoods. There was also a significant gap between genders, with boys achieving significantly lower GLD scores than girls.

The Early Language and Literacy Project is a three-strand approach which supports schools to address their low development levels. The three programme strands are focused on training and supporting teachers at eight different Bradford schools. The programme included:

  • An Early Writing CPD course for teachers, where they learnt about what encourages young children’s writing and developed strategies to build on that knowledge
  • Workshops on the ‘Sharing Stories Together’ initiative, which is a project aimed at building up parents’ skills as storytellers, which the teachers could then adapt for their classrooms
  • A Fathers Reading Every Day (FRED) course, which is a course designed to look at how teachers and practitioners can better engage dads and male carers in children’s early literacy

Imran Hafeez, Manager of the National Literacy Trust’s Hub in Bradford, said:

“The results from the pilot are very encouraging and have demonstrated the value of partnership working. We were clear that we wanted a programme to support practitioners in the classroom and at the same time strengthen links with parents through tools like sharing stories and fathers reading to their children. This has encouraged schools to shine a positive light on the value of parental involvement in supporting reading and writing for enjoyment and develop stronger links as a result. In the next year we look forward to working with another 10 primary schools and presenting the programme to the education endowment fund”.

Chris Tolson, Head of Teaching and Learning at Bradford Birth to 19 Teaching School Alliance, said:

“This first phase of this project saw system leaders deployed to support class teachers and provide school-to-school support. This way of working proved very effective and was a key ingredient to the project’s success. It is a great example of partnership working and shows how leaders and teachers can support each other to improve outcomes for pupils across Bradford.”

Lynn Donohue, Early Years Strategic Manager at Bradford Council, said:

“As a result of our annual thorough analysis of pupil performance at the end of reception year it was clear that, although the performance of our 5 year-olds is improving strongly in Bradford, there was still some low pupil performance in reading and writing and for some groups of pupils.  We identified that the gap between the performance of boys and girls was increasing and the gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and non-free school meals was not closing. This piece of work has enabled us to really target resource and expertise in the design and development of this intervention through our delivery partners. The first pilot in 2015-16 has resulted in some early evidence of success and already delivered improved outcomes for our young children; as a result of this, we are engaging in a second year with our partners.’